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How the need to filter noise from social media to deliver trusted news worldwide led to a versatile tool for social media events monitoring.

At Thomson Reuters, we take our Trust Principles very seriously. The preservation of independence, integrity and freedom from bias is fundamental to the way we do business, so it’s only natural that our internal teams would establish a way to crowdsource news notifications from the people who see events first viathe most unlikely of sources: Twitter.

Sameena Shah , our director of research for technology development, and nike roshe run black and gold womens sunglasses
, the executive editor for editorial operations in the data and innovation division of Reuters, led the way in building Reuters News Tracer from the ground up in an innovative intrapreneurship.

View the 2016 Annual Report: The Partnership Equation to see highlights from our strategic partnerships with clients, startups and universities over the last year.

Reginald Chua :Reuters News Tracer is a capability that we’ve developed with our RD team that finds events that are breaking on Twitter . It assigns them a newsworthiness score so you can focus on the things that are important, and the real magic of it is that it then gives a confidence score about how likely it is that those events are true. This is really critical because the landscape of news has changed dramatically.

Reginald Chua

Sameena Shah :Over the last almost one decade we have seen an increasing amount of news events unraveling first on social media. In some ways we can say that social media has actually disrupted the news industry and journalists do need to tap into that information and signals that are available in social media. So the mission really was to tap into the social media content to figure out what the news events really are and present them in a timely manner as soon as possible. The goal was to effectively get rid of all the spam, the noise and only harness the signal or the news events that are important for our journalists and eventually our customers.

“Right around when we figured out cooling, then came the question: Can you do heating?” said postdoctoral fellow Po-Chun Hsu, who was first author on the recent paper. It was a particularly chilly winter, and he was headed to a conference in Minneapolis with a carry-on bag full of coats. Could he create an article of clothing that would serve him in a crowded warm conference room as well as on the frosty street?

Hsu realized that controlling radiation could work both ways. He stacked two layers of material with different abilities to release heat energy, and then sandwiched them between layers of their cooling polyethylene.

On one side, a copper coating traps heat between a polyethylene layer and the skin; on the other, a carbon coating releases heat under another layer of polyethylene. Worn with the copper layer facing out, the material traps heat and warms the skin on cool days. With the carbon layer facing out, it releases heat, keeping the wearer cool.

Combined, the sandwiched material can increase a person’s range of comfortable temperatures over 10 F, and Hsu predicts that the potential range is much larger – close to 25 F. With inhabitants wearing a textile like that, buildings in some climates might never need air conditioning or central heating at all.

The white-colored fabric isn’t quite wearable yet, the team said.

“Ideally, when we get to the stuff you want to wear on skin, we’ll need to make it into a fiber woven structure,” said Cui. Woven textiles are stronger, more elastic, more comfortable, and look much more like typical clothing. But good news: They’ve already started testing to make sure their fabric will be machine washable.

“From my perspective, this work really highlights the significant opportunities in combining thermal engineering concepts with nanophotonic structures for creating novel functionalities,” said Shanhui Fan , a professor of electrical engineering who participated in the work.

The team’s ambitions are to create an easily manufactured, practical textile that people could use to save huge amounts of energy around the world. And they don’t stop there – Cui, Hsu and Fan envision clothing with medical devices and even entertainment printed right into the fabric.

“I think we are only seeing the beginning of many creative ideas that can come out of such combinations,” Fan said.

Cui is also professor of photon science at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and a member of Stanford Bio-X , the Precourt Institute for Energy and the Stanford Neurosciences Institute . Fan is also an affiliate of the Precourt Institute for Energy. Other Stanford researchers who contributed to the study are postdoctoral fellows Chong Liu, Alex Y. Song, Jin Xie, Kai Liu and Lili Cai; graduate students Ze Zhang, Yucan Peng, Chun-Lan Wu and Shang Zhai; senior research engineer Peter B. Catrysse; and Arun Majumdar , a professor of mechanical engineering and of photon science and co-director of the Precourt Institute for Energy.

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